© S & J Abbott Ceramics Plus September 2020
S & J Abbott Ceramics Plus
Charles Williams: ‘Patent Pupetts alias Hertford Fantoccini’ Charles Williams, a hand coloured satiricsl etching, ‘Patent Pupetts alias Hertford Fantoccini’, was published April 6th 1812 by S W Fores, 50 Picadilly, London Lady Hertford (right), mistress of George IV, was a political manipulator, faces John Bull in front of a puppet theatre, whose small scale is shown by its relation to these two large three-quarter length figures. Lady Hertford's raised right arm is behind the curtain from which her hand emerges, holding the four strings attached to the wrists and toes of Spencer Perceval, the only puppet on the stage, whose background is a realistic view of the screen of Carlton House. He wears his Chancellor of the Exchequer's gown, and bows deprecatingly, as if making a speech. A paper, 'Delicate Investigation', projects from his pocket. This investigation was into the behaviour of the King’s estranged wife Caroline with a view to divorce. She left England in 1814. In her right arm are four puppets, who are assumed to be (left to right): Arthur Wellesley, Buckingham, Temple and Sidmouth. Behind her head two discarded puppets hang perpendicularly, back to back: Grenville to the left and Grey. On the proscenium: 'Regency Theatre', in large letters with a scroll: 'Nunc aut Nunquam'. John Bull, a yokel in a smock, holding his hat and cudgel, scratches his head, exclaiming: "Laud! Laud! be they all your own meaking what a clever Leady thee must be. whoy there beant such another in all Hertford." She answers: "Yes Jonny they are all manufactured by me & my Son. I can make them do any thing, the[y] work so easy, only Perceive all the gestures of this Lawyer like Gentleman with the delicate investigation in his pocket, he is my principal actor & always ready to take any part—those Grey & Green-vile looking figures behind me are so stiff & stubborn that I cannot do any thing with them, & am obliged to put them aside, Why I have had the Honor of performing before the Prince Regent, & he has given me permission to write up, Performer to his Royal Highness." Her hair is dressed with two circlets simulating a crown, and with the Prince's feathers. She is much décolletée; and on her belt are the words 'Fide et Amo[re]', the Hertford motto. In front of the stage is a playbill: 'Theatre Royal Hertford—The Piece call'd Secret Influence will be continued some time longer, a Revived piece in one Act call'd The Petition Regegted [sic] will be performed in the course of a few days to which will be added the Baggatelle the Cits in the Suds or How can you help it—NB no person permitted to peep behind the Curtain but the Performers.' Condition a couple of stabilised small tears and signs of age. Stock No SAP0815 Price £550
Back Back
© S & J Abbott Ceramics Plus September 2020
S & J Abbott Ceramics Plus
Charles Williams: ‘Patent Pupetts alias Hertford Fantoccini’ Charles Williams, a hand coloured satiricsl etching, ‘Patent Pupetts alias Hertford Fantoccini’, was published April 6th 1812 by S W Fores, 50 Picadilly, London Lady Hertford (right), mistress of George IV, was a political manipulator, faces John Bull in front of a puppet theatre, whose small scale is shown by its relation to these two large three-quarter length figures. Lady Hertford's raised right arm is behind the curtain from which her hand emerges, holding the four strings attached to the wrists and toes of Spencer Perceval, the only puppet on the stage, whose background is a realistic view of the screen of Carlton House. He wears his Chancellor of the Exchequer's gown, and bows deprecatingly, as if making a speech. A paper, 'Delicate Investigation', projects from his pocket. This investigation was into the behaviour of the King’s estranged wife Caroline with a view to divorce. She left England in 1814. In her right arm are four puppets, who are assumed to be (left to right): Arthur Wellesley, Buckingham, Temple and Sidmouth. Behind her head two discarded puppets hang perpendicularly, back to back: Grenville to the left and Grey. On the proscenium: 'Regency Theatre', in large letters with a scroll: 'Nunc aut Nunquam'. John Bull, a yokel in a smock, holding his hat and cudgel, scratches his head, exclaiming: "Laud! Laud! be they all your own meaking what a clever Leady thee must be. whoy there beant such another in all Hertford." She answers: "Yes Jonny they are all manufactured by me & my Son. I can make them do any thing, the[y] work so easy, only Perceive all the gestures of this Lawyer like Gentleman with the delicate investigation in his pocket, he is my principal actor & always ready to take any part—those Grey & Green- vile looking figures behind me are so stiff & stubborn that I cannot do any thing with them, & am obliged to put them aside, Why I have had the Honor of performing before the Prince Regent, & he has given me permission to write up, Performer to his Royal Highness." Her hair is dressed with two circlets simulating a crown, and with the Prince's feathers. She is much décolletée; and on her belt are the words 'Fide et Amo[re]', the Hertford motto. In front of the stage is a playbill: 'Theatre Royal Hertford—The Piece call'd Secret Influence will be continued some time longer, a Revived piece in one Act call'd The Petition Regegted [sic] will be performed in the course of a few days to which will be added the Baggatelle the Cits in the Suds or How can you help it—NB no person permitted to peep behind the Curtain but the Performers.' Condition a couple of stabilised small tears and signs of age. Stock No SAP0815 Price £550
Back Back