© S & J Abbott Ceramics Plus May 2020
S & J Abbott Ceramics Plus
This is a very rare print. The R(oya)I Hen and the Dunghill Cock was published by John Fairburn, London in November 1820. It shows a cock with the face of the King standing on a dunghill, (a green bag) while a large eagle representing ‘Public Disapprobation’ swoops down to pluck the royal crown from his head. His advisors are by his side. To the left is a smaller hen with the face of the Queen standing on a pillar inscribed ‘The Law and the People’ the sword and scales of Justice lie at its base, and fasces, symbols of power drawn from the ancient Roman Republic, rest on either side of it. Rays from the sun irradiate her, in contrast to the clouds which hover above the king, and she has just been crowned by a hand that reaches down from the clouds (Manus populi). The inference here is that Caroline has powers from heaven as well as ancient powers from Roman times supporting her position against a vindictive King, it could also be read as the King ignores public opinion at his peril. The decision to drop the Pains and Penalties Bill was made on 10th November 1820 even though it had passed the House of Lords. The government were not confident that it would pass the Commons. Public opinion was still supportive of the Queen and the King was unpopular, Caroline remained the Queen. Condition:Some small losses to paper in the sky to the right of the eagle. Stock No: SAP0817 Price: £450
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© S & J Abbott Ceramics Plus May 2020
S & J Abbott Ceramics Plus
This is a very rare print. The R(oya)I Hen and the Dunghill Cock was published by John Fairburn, London in November 1820. It shows a cock with the face of the King standing on a dunghill, (a green bag) while a large eagle representing ‘Public Disapprobation’ swoops down to pluck the royal crown from his head. His advisors are by his side. To the left is a smaller hen with the face of the Queen standing on a pillar inscribed ‘The Law and the People’ the sword and scales of Justice lie at its base, and fasces, symbols of power drawn from the ancient Roman Republic, rest on either side of it. Rays from the sun irradiate her, in contrast to the clouds which hover above the king, and she has just been crowned by a hand that reaches down from the clouds (Manus populi). The inference here is that Caroline has powers from heaven as well as ancient powers from Roman times supporting her position against a vindictive King, it could also be read as the King ignores public opinion at his peril. The decision to drop the Pains and Penalties Bill was made on 10th November 1820 even though it had passed the House of Lords. The government were not confident that it would pass the Commons. Public opinion was still supportive of the Queen and the King was unpopular, Caroline remained the Queen. Condition:Some small losses to paper in the sky to the right of the eagle. Stock No: SAP0817 Price: £450
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