© S & J Abbott Ceramics Plus July 2020
S & J Abbott Ceramics Plus

George Cruickshank: The Afterpiece of The Tragedy of Waterloo - or - Madame Francoise & her

Managers!!! Hand coloured etching on wove paper, published by William Hone, 55 Fleet Street,

November 9, 1815, plate 21. 35 cm wide x 24.7 cm high.

France, or 'Mme Françoise', is a woman, larger in scale than the other figures, whom the Allies pinion, plunder, and maltreat. She is on the ground on her back, supported on her arms, with a heavy fetter attached to her left wrist and right leg. She wears a décolletée high-waisted dress, with bare arms and legs; her hair is loose. Wellington (right) kneels to hammer to the ground an iron plate attached to her left wrist: Alexander (left) locks a large padlock by which her chained left leg is linked to a staple in the ground. The former says: ""We enter France as Friends"—well, I've crippled her Arms if that will do her any good." The Tsar says: ""It is necessary that France shod be great & powerfull in order to keep up the Ballance of Power for the security of Europe" [see No. 12558] But 'tis the great I who must preponderate in this Ballance." Beside him stands a fat Dutchman representing William I; he stoops over Mme Françoise to cut off with scissors a part of the skirt of her dress, inscribed 'Netherlands'. He is dressed like the Dutchman in English caricature in bulky breeches and short jacket, but over his shoulders is the ribbon of an order. In his hat is a tobacco-pipe. On the extreme left. Francis I raises a mallet in both hands to hammer the staple by which the chain held by the Tsar is attached to the ground. He says: "We come to restore France to her Ancient rights & Liberties." A figure in armour which bristles with ferocious spikes represents the armed forces of the Allies. The face is covered by the helmet which is topped by a small cannon with six large feathers waving from the touch-hole; the largest, in the centre, is inscribed 'England', the others are 'Russia', 'Prussia', 'Austria', with 'Holland' (small) and 'Sweeden' (drooping). This monster plants one foot on the stomach of Mme Françoise, while he uses a musket whose bayonet has been converted into a spoon to cram tiny figures into her mouth. The fat posterior and gouty legs of the half-swallowed Louis XVIII project from her mouth; the others are lined up on the spoon, eager to be swallowed: the foremost is the Duchesse d'Angoulême, with outstretched arms. The other three must be her husband, the Cte d'Artois, and the Duc de Berry; they have a flag inscribed 'Les Bourbons'. Behind the victim's right shoulder stands Blücher, lunging forward to drag a large purse from her pocket, and to seize the miniature of 'Napoleon' which hangs from her necklace. He says: ""France shall choose her own rulers" only she must have the Bourbons we know what is best for her & ourselves too." Behind her Castlereagh walks off to the right, holding up a mural crown bristling with guns and a bonnet rouge, both of which he has just snatched from her head. He turns his head in profile, saying: "It delights me when I see a Country enjoy her Old established Privileges—My Own Country to wit." In the foreground beside La France lie a damaged laurel-wreath, a broken spear, and a shattered shield inscribed 'Napoleon le Grand'. In the middle distance soldiers stand at attention with fixed bayonets and in close formation, watching the proceedings. In front of them (right) three soldiers walk off to the right, heavily burdened. The first two have baskets on their shoulders. The first is heaped with feathers, and is inscribed 'Borrowed Feathers'. From the second, 'Borrowed Ornaments', project miniature statues: a woman and a horse. The third carries a picture on his shoulder and a portfolio under his arm. Behind, on rising ground above the tips of the soldiers' bayonets, are two scenes. On the left a rectangular pilastered building stands upside down, poised on the apex of its roof. Above it is a scroll inscribed 'Louvre 1815'. Beside it (right) is an enormous placard, decorated with fleurs-de-lis and inscribed: 'In consequence of the "removal of the pictures & other things", The public are respectfly inform'd That this Buildg will in future be used as a Bastile—artists are therefore invited to send in plans of alteration, improvement &c &c— NB The Holy Inquisition of Spain have kindly ojferd to supply the necessary instruments.' Frenchmen (left) stare at the building with amazement. An officer looks through a telescope, saying, "Ah! Dear me I see they have turn'd it inside out." A civilian turns to his companions, shrugging his shoulders: "By gar! it is not like de same place as it vas." As a pendant to this, John Bull, a countryman, stands on a grassy plateau (right). He watches the Allies with a delighted grin, saying, "My soul but they are befriending Mumzel Franca indeed!!—Well I've no objection to their rendering her all that sort of assistance in their Power, for she well deserves it! Only they didn't mention all this fun in their Proclamations!!!!" A curtain draped from the upper margin gives the semblance of a proscenium. Published 9 November 1815. Stock No. SAP0866 Price £650
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© S & J Abbott Ceramics Plus July 2020
S & J Abbott Ceramics Plus

George Cruickshank: The Afterpiece of The Tragedy of

Waterloo - or - Madame Francoise & her Managers!!!

Hand coloured etching on wove paper, published by

William Hone, 55 Fleet Street, November 9, 1815, plate

21. 35 cm wide x 24.7 cm high.

France, or 'Mme Françoise', is a woman, larger in scale than the other figures, whom the Allies pinion, plunder, and maltreat. She is on the ground on her back, supported on her arms, with a heavy fetter attached to her left wrist and right leg. She wears a décolletée high-waisted dress, with bare arms and legs; her hair is loose. Wellington (right) kneels to hammer to the ground an iron plate attached to her left wrist: Alexander (left) locks a large padlock by which her chained left leg is linked to a staple in the ground. The former says: ""We enter France as Friends"—well, I've crippled her Arms if that will do her any good." The Tsar says: ""It is necessary that France shod be great & powerfull in order to keep up the Ballance of Power for the security of Europe" [see No. 12558] But 'tis the great I who must preponderate in this Ballance." Beside him stands a fat Dutchman representing William I; he stoops over Mme Françoise to cut off with scissors a part of the skirt of her dress, inscribed 'Netherlands'. He is dressed like the Dutchman in English caricature in bulky breeches and short jacket, but over his shoulders is the ribbon of an order. In his hat is a tobacco-pipe. On the extreme left. Francis I raises a mallet in both hands to hammer the staple by which the chain held by the Tsar is attached to the ground. He says: "We come to restore France to her Ancient rights & Liberties." A figure in armour which bristles with ferocious spikes represents the armed forces of the Allies. The face is covered by the helmet which is topped by a small cannon with six large feathers waving from the touch-hole; the largest, in the centre, is inscribed 'England', the others are 'Russia', 'Prussia', 'Austria', with 'Holland' (small) and 'Sweeden' (drooping). This monster plants one foot on the stomach of Mme Françoise, while he uses a musket whose bayonet has been converted into a spoon to cram tiny figures into her mouth. The fat posterior and gouty legs of the half-swallowed Louis XVIII project from her mouth; the others are lined up on the spoon, eager to be swallowed: the foremost is the Duchesse d'Angoulême, with outstretched arms. The other three must be her husband, the Cte d'Artois, and the Duc de Berry; they have a flag inscribed 'Les Bourbons'. Behind the victim's right shoulder stands Blücher, lunging forward to drag a large purse from her pocket, and to seize the miniature of 'Napoleon' which hangs from her necklace. He says: ""France shall choose her own rulers" only she must have the Bourbons we know what is best for her & ourselves too." Behind her Castlereagh walks off to the right, holding up a mural crown bristling with guns and a bonnet rouge, both of which he has just snatched from her head. He turns his head in profile, saying: "It delights me when I see a Country enjoy her Old established Privileges—My Own Country to wit." In the foreground beside La France lie a damaged laurel-wreath, a broken spear, and a shattered shield inscribed 'Napoleon le Grand'. In the middle distance soldiers stand at attention with fixed bayonets and in close formation, watching the proceedings. In front of them (right) three soldiers walk off to the right, heavily burdened. The first two have baskets on their shoulders. The first is heaped with feathers, and is inscribed 'Borrowed Feathers'. From the second, 'Borrowed Ornaments', project miniature statues: a woman and a horse. The third carries a picture on his shoulder and a portfolio under his arm. Behind, on rising ground above the tips of the soldiers' bayonets, are two scenes. On the left a rectangular pilastered building stands upside down, poised on the apex of its roof. Above it is a scroll inscribed 'Louvre 1815'. Beside it (right) is an enormous placard, decorated with fleurs-de-lis and inscribed: 'In consequence of the "removal of the pictures & other things", The public are respectfly inform'd That this Buildg will in future be used as a Bastile—artists are therefore invited to send in plans of alteration, improvement &c &c— NB The Holy Inquisition of Spain have kindly ojferd to supply the necessary instruments.' Frenchmen (left) stare at the building with amazement. An officer looks through a telescope, saying, "Ah! Dear me I see they have turn'd it inside out." A civilian turns to his companions, shrugging his shoulders: "By gar! it is not like de same place as it vas." As a pendant to this, John Bull, a countryman, stands on a grassy plateau (right). He watches the Allies with a delighted grin, saying, "My soul but they are befriending Mumzel Franca indeed!!—Well I've no objection to their rendering her all that sort of assistance in their Power, for she well deserves it! Only they didn't mention all this fun in their Proclamations!!!!" A curtain draped from the upper margin gives the semblance of a proscenium. Published 9 November 1815. Stock No. SAP0866 Price £650
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